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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
At the Tokyo Motor Show the MX-30 was unveiled with a 35.5 kWh battery and an electric motor capable of producing 142 horsepower (105 kW) and 192 lb-ft (264 Nm) of torque.

The range is expected to be 130 miles (~210km) for the European model, which is likely using the WLTP testing standard. Which means the EPA range could be a bit lower at around 120 miles (~193km).

120-130 miles may not seem like a lot at first glance but I know it’ll be more than enough for my daily commute. However, it might not enough be for others.

With that being said, what does everyone else think about the range?
 

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At the Tokyo Motor Show the MX-30 was unveiled with a 35.5 kWh battery and an electric motor capable of producing 142 horsepower (105 kW) and 192 lb-ft (264 Nm) of torque.

The range is expected to be 130 miles (~210km) for the European model, which is likely using the WLTP testing standard. Which means the EPA range could be a bit lower at around 120 miles (~193km).

120-130 miles may not seem like a lot at first glance but I know it’ll be more than enough for my daily commute. However, it might not enough be for others.

With that being said, what does everyone else think about the range?
Not god at all for the money they would ask if true about £30.000. Most of the more established AV makers got their upcoming models with 200 miles and over range on single charge. Saying that those models are smaller city cars and not SUVs but for me with the AV the range covered on single charge is most important and the maker with longest range for around that amount of money will take my money next Year
 

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Mazda MX-30 First Edition Black Mica Industrial Vintage
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17,9kWh/100km out of 4.902 Kilometers driving.
1/4 normal Roads - 3/4 Highway, but mostly behind a Truck to get slipstream ...

Our second MX-30 is used at City-Car and Town to Town Car ... over 3.000km --> 18,9kWh/100km

Outside Temperature is a big factor. Over 10°C its possible to reach 15,9kWh/100km. Got that at my first 2.000km ...
 

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At the Tokyo Motor Show the MX-30 was unveiled with a 35.5 kWh battery and an electric motor capable of producing 142 horsepower (105 kW) and 192 lb-ft (264 Nm) of torque.

The range is expected to be 130 miles (~210km) for the European model, which is likely using the WLTP testing standard. Which means the EPA range could be a bit lower at around 120 miles (~193km).

120-130 miles may not seem like a lot at first glance but I know it’ll be more than enough for my daily commute. However, it might not enough be for others.

With that being said, what does everyone else think about the range?
Well, here we are.....We have a 2019 Kona (64Kw) and today we bought a 100th Anniversary MX30, White with Maroon roof. We now have 2 cars at totally opposite range scales. This MX30 is our 4th EV since 2015, so we are not new to electric driving! We had a Kia Soul, Tesla Model S, and a Kona, and all used our wall box for heating up the battery and cabin, therefore not eating into the battery range. But the Mazda uses its own battery for that purpose, even when plugged in. That’s crazy! Not only that, but the Mazda doesn’t seem to warm up the battery either. It doesn’t show anywhere that it does, even at -17c, and the gauge on the screen shows the needle in the cold blue area. What’s going on Mazda? You also contradict yourself by saying that the reason you created a small battery is to save the environment as it’s cleaner to manufacture and that the car’s range falls within the average daily commute. When I asked the dealer why they didn’t make a “Frunk” in the spacious engine compartment, he said that the space was left for a future “Range Extender”....a RANGE EXTENDER? Yes a range extender using petrol which we are trying to get away from. If the MX30 has a range extender it will be useless here in Norway who has the most toll charges in Europe, and only 100% electric cars are exempt from paying tolls. Mazda, why didn’t you create a slightly bigger battery in the first place? Not happy at all...
 

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Well, here we are.....We have a 2019 Kona (64Kw) and today we bought a 100th Anniversary MX30, White with Maroon roof. We now have 2 cars at totally opposite range scales. This MX30 is our 4th EV since 2015, so we are not new to electric driving! We had a Kia Soul, Tesla Model S, and a Kona, and all used our wall box for heating up the battery and cabin, therefore not eating into the battery range. But the Mazda uses its own battery for that purpose, even when plugged in. That’s crazy! Not only that, but the Mazda doesn’t seem to warm up the battery either. It doesn’t show anywhere that it does, even at -17c, and the gauge on the screen shows the needle in the cold blue area. What’s going on Mazda? You also contradict yourself by saying that the reason you created a small battery is to save the environment as it’s cleaner to manufacture and that the car’s range falls within the average daily commute. When I asked the dealer why they didn’t make a “Frunk” in the spacious engine compartment, he said that the space was left for a future “Range Extender”....a RANGE EXTENDER? Yes a range extender using petrol which we are trying to get away from. If the MX30 has a range extender it will be useless here in Norway who has the most toll charges in Europe, and only 100% electric cars are exempt from paying tolls. Mazda, why didn’t you create a slightly bigger battery in the first place? Not happy at all...
The range extender answer is so dumb... The mx30 is sold as a Hybrid in Japan so THAT is why it needs the room under the hood. Mazda took a ICE/Hybrid CUV removed the hybrid drivetrain and installed a EV one. Same thing as the mini-e
 

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The MX-30's official range of 130 miles between charges is far less than that achieved by rivals; the Hyundai Kona Electric and Kia e-Niro are both proven to be capable of more than 250 miles in real-world conditions.
That is comparing apples and pears. The Kona / Kia with 64kwh battery are at least Eur 10,000 more expensive than the Mazda.
 

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Well, here we are.....We have a 2019 Kona (64Kw) and today we bought a 100th Anniversary MX30, White with Maroon roof. We now have 2 cars at totally opposite range scales. This MX30 is our 4th EV since 2015, so we are not new to electric driving! We had a Kia Soul, Tesla Model S, and a Kona, and all used our wall box for heating up the battery and cabin, therefore not eating into the battery range. But the Mazda uses its own battery for that purpose, even when plugged in. That’s crazy! Not only that, but the Mazda doesn’t seem to warm up the battery either. It doesn’t show anywhere that it does, even at -17c, and the gauge on the screen shows the needle in the cold blue area. What’s going on Mazda? You also contradict yourself by saying that the reason you created a small battery is to save the environment as it’s cleaner to manufacture and that the car’s range falls within the average daily commute. When I asked the dealer why they didn’t make a “Frunk” in the spacious engine compartment, he said that the space was left for a future “Range Extender”....a RANGE EXTENDER? Yes a range extender using petrol which we are trying to get away from. If the MX30 has a range extender it will be useless here in Norway who has the most toll charges in Europe, and only 100% electric cars are exempt from paying tolls. Mazda, why didn’t you create a slightly bigger battery in the first place? Not happy at all...
Battery heating seems to be a problem, see elsewhere on this forum.
 

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That is comparing apples and pears. The Kona / Kia with 64kwh battery are at least Eur 10,000 more expensive than the Mazda.
Yes that is the case as we have both apples and pears :). My wife has the Mazda MX30 and me the Kona 64kw.
 

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The MX-30's official range of 130 miles between charges is far less than that achieved by rivals; the Hyundai Kona Electric and Kia e-Niro are both proven to be capable of more than 250 miles in real-world conditions.
True, but they are also a lot more expensive if you take a similar trim level.
 

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True, but they are also a lot more expensive if you take a similar trim level.
I made a round trip last week visiting several family members, total some 250 Km. During my second (family) stop I charged the car on a public road charger, which was supposed to be a 22KW 3-phase charger, so I should have received the full 6.6 KW the Mazda can take on a single phase. But unfortunately I only got 3.7 KW on a single phase, so after my visit I had only topped up 6 KWh. On my way back after the third family member I then stopped 10 min at a fast charger on the high-way, and made it home with 10% charge left. All in all quite acceptable as I lost just 10 min to charging. So for this type of trips I see no range problem with the Mazda. The advantages of a small battery are obviously a cheaper car, more agile driving, and lower environmental foot-print when building the car.
 

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Dear Members. My experience so fare after half year of owning an MX-30.
I drive this car 99% in the city. As the outside temperature rises now having range up to 235 km with full charge. Mostly I charge the car only to 80%, sometimes to 90%. With my last charge to 90% the predicted range was 213 km. With 100% about 235km. It is pretty much clouse to the actual driven km, sometimes the reality is slightly better. Average consumption is 11-13 kWh/100km. Without heating.
256
 

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Dear Members. My experience so fare after half year of owning an MX-30.
I drive this car 99% in the city. As the outside temperature rises now having range up to 235 km with full charge. Mostly I charge the car only to 80%, sometimes to 90%. With my last charge to 90% the predicted range was 213 km. With 100% about 235km. It is pretty much clouse to the actual driven km, sometimes the reality is slightly better. Average consumption is 11-13 kWh/100km. Without heating. View attachment 256
That is very good. My experience is highway 16-17 Kwh / 100 km, regional roads 13-14 Kwh / 100 km and city about 12 Kwh / 100 km. My average now stands at 15.9 Kwh / 100 km. That gives me a range of 200 km, with a usable battery of about 32 KWh.

The range is fine to my daily life. But I do have a problem with longer trips due to slow (fast) charging. I made a few longer trips recently, and luckily we have a decent network of fast-chargers in NL. Regrettably, I noticed that the Mazda only charges at decent speed when the battery temperature is over half on the temperature gauge, which it most often is not, When the battery is warm, I charge 20 to 80% in half an hour, which is acceptable to me. When the battery is cold (less than half on the meter) it charges only about 7-8 KWh in half an hour, which is far too slow. So I think Mazda should fix this, either by warming the battery, or by allowing it to charge a bit faster.
 

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Interesting to see what sensible driving in towns and cities can achieve. My experience, after 800 miles of mixed driving, is close to Berts though I do find that heating, set at 19C, has a bigger impact than the Mazda estimate. I bought the car for short journeys and have no intention of charging away from home but I tried a "fast" charge to see how it went just in case it were ever needed. Ambient temperature 5C, SOC 24%, and I loaded 17kWhr in an hour. What I would like Mazda to explain is why the battery charge rate is limited by low temperature but the cooling fan on the radiator was running the whole time! Why isn't the battery temperature allowed to rise a little to increase the charge rate? There is little point asking the Dealer as I probably know more about the EV aspects of the car than they do? Does anyone have an explanation?
 

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What I would like Mazda to explain is why the battery charge rate is limited by low temperature but the cooling fan on the radiator was running the whole time! Why isn't the battery temperature allowed to rise a little to increase the charge rate? There is little point asking the Dealer as I probably know more about the EV aspects of the car than they do? Does anyone have an explanation?

Hi,

My only idea is the MX-30 cooling system. This works via heat exchanger and can be used for heating and cooling as required. I have noticed reecently that the radiator fan is not working when charging the car with warm outside temperatures. Will someone correct me please if I am wrong. Obviously missing the preheating feature for fast charging as in the teslas.
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