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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, i just bought my Mx-30 Built 2020-06.

the car had 4000km on the dash and the question i have is my range on 100% is around 160kms at 16kw/h avarage consumption with outside temp at 18 degrees Celsius. Is this a normal range or is it something that gets better?

BR
 

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Hello, i just bought my Mx-30 Built 2020-06.

the car had 4000km on the dash and the question i have is my range on 100% is around 160kms at 16kw/h avarage consumption with outside temp at 18 degrees Celsius. Is this a normal range or is it something that gets better?

BR
Welcome to the forum!!!!
At last a fellow Swede!
Yes and no.
You will learn to drive it more efficiently if this is your first EV. Just google how to drive your EV to get better range. Steady does it, avoid speeds above 100 kmh, go easy on the AC, use regen in town etc etc.
The way you drive has a huge impact on efficiency. And its kind of fun too. There is a buffer below zero wich allegedly is around 20 km in summer if driven cautiously. However to go too low in state of charge will not improve your EVs battery health.
Winter will make this worse. Expect at least 20% less range.
The battery is small for the size of car.
But for everyday driving its phenomenal. Dont despair, Swedes according to AMS in general love their MX-30s and chances are you will too.
 

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That sounds short. Just picked up my new one, it shows a bit over 200 km when fully charged (same temp roughly, I’m also in Sweden) My guess is that the car calculates range based on your driving the latest x mins/km:s. If That is the case, some more careful driving should imorove the range shown.
It might be explained in the manual😆
 

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I second Vivamazda's view. When I picked up the car brand new, it forecast 167km for 99% charge. Now, based on the computational algorithm, (which in my opinion incudes a baseline calculation heavily modified by one's short term driving) it typically shows 200km for 90% charge. (I only charge to 100% if I absolutely have to. Interestingly, the car prevents regeneration at 100% charge and then progressively allows more regen as stored energy is used and full regeneration only resumes at 90%. That's how I decided to charge to 90% normally). I thought that I had driven carefully for the first 20km driving home and the read-out showed 15.1kw/100km. (4.1 miles/kW is much easier!). Now, I feel that I am actually driving more quickly but find 13.8 and better quite normal. Key is only to use the acceleration that you need; limit to 3 units on the power meter and keep maximum speed to 65 mph (104k). Then smooth driving and anticipation show more benefit than a combustion engine car. I think this is because the vast majority of ICE cars have no freewheel and therefore always waste energy on the overrun. For the very best range, use minimum regeneration setting and freewheel: there is much more very slight downhill gradient than you ever realised! Slow down via anticipation, regeneration and mechanical brake only when you have to. It is amazing what efficiency one can actually get and it is rewarding and quite fun. I find air-con in our summer climate has a fairly small effect (20.5C setpoint) and is swamped by the variable of driving style. However, heating on a frosty day is a big power user so that needs a lot of care if you want range. Finally, do make sure that tyre pressures are set correctly including increasing them for a fully loaded car (only for long range). Though rarely mentioned, pressure setting is at 20C and P*V/T in cold weather.
 

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I second Vivamazda's view. When I picked up the car brand new, it forecast 167km for 99% charge. Now, based on the computational algorithm, (which in my opinion incudes a baseline calculation heavily modified by one's short term driving) it typically shows 200km for 90% charge. (I only charge to 100% if I absolutely have to. Interestingly, the car prevents regeneration at 100% charge and then progressively allows more regen as stored energy is used and full regeneration only resumes at 90%. That's how I decided to charge to 90% normally). I thought that I had driven carefully for the first 20km driving home and the read-out showed 15.1kw/100km. (4.1 miles/kW is much easier!). Now, I feel that I am actually driving more quickly but find 13.8 and better quite normal. Key is only to use the acceleration that you need; limit to 3 units on the power meter and keep maximum speed to 65 mph (104k). Then smooth driving and anticipation show more benefit than a combustion engine car. I think this is because the vast majority of ICE cars have no freewheel and therefore always waste energy on the overrun. For the very best range, use minimum regeneration setting and freewheel: there is much more very slight downhill gradient than you ever realised! Slow down via anticipation, regeneration and mechanical brake only when you have to. It is amazing what efficiency one can actually get and it is rewarding and quite fun. I find air-con in our summer climate has a fairly small effect (20.5C setpoint) and is swamped by the variable of driving style. However, heating on a frosty day is a big power user so that needs a lot of care if you want range. Finally, do make sure that tyre pressures are set correctly including increasing them for a fully loaded car (only for long range). Though rarely mentioned, pressure setting is at 20C and P*V/T in cold weather.
What Milkfloat is writing about here is how to make the most of a machine as is. It will give you joy and a happier life. Could apply to people to. Smart guy this Milkfloat.😃👍

Preconditioning in winter is an Akilles heel of the MX-30. When preconditioning the default setting should be to use the plug not the battery if plugged in. Contacted Mazda Sweden about this did not get a reply. Got evasive answers and murmurs.
Did anyone manage to get Mazda to explain this? Its clearly a design error and yep Mazda, again, you need to fix it. Please. Like now. Before winter. Can you actually contact Mazda Europe directly? Anyone knows anyone at Mazda Europe?
 

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I think that the Mazda country teams know very little about technical design of the MX-30 and the dealerships know even less. There were glazed looks when I mentioned anything remotely technical. Mazda UK was very helpful when I had a problem with my NewMotion charger but remained silent when I asked for comment on a software issue. One wonders if the Japanese designers have even been made aware of the Winter pre-conditioning issue. Remember that when you apply fluid to a very dense filter, little if anything passes through!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello everyone! I’m thankful for all the tricks and tips you have written! I already started to see an increase of 20km from 160 to 180km in only one day that was my first day with the car. Your tips will obviously make the range even further. I actually work in a battery manufacturing company and have seen how we produce lithium batteries and to see lithium in action with the Mx-30 is mind blowing, EVs have come really far in a short time.
One question I have is about the preconditioning in the winter, is it basically warming up the batteries before the departure like the diesel heaters in diesel cars?
BR
 

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Hello everyone! I’m thankful for all the tricks and tips you have written! I already started to see an increase of 20km from 160 to 180km in only one day that was my first day with the car. Your tips will obviously make the range even further. I actually work in a battery manufacturing company and have seen how we produce lithium batteries and to see lithium in action with the Mx-30 is mind blowing, EVs have come really far in a short time.
One question I have is about the preconditioning in the winter, is it basically warming up the batteries before the departure like the diesel heaters in diesel cars?
BR
Heating the cabin so its nice and toasty in the chilly morning. Probably the batteries too but not sure. The battery heater seems to go into action rarely on the MX-30. The problem being that in an ICE you get heat from combustion. Not so much in an EV. Efficiency is a lot better in an EV than an ICE so the heating energy of the cabin makes much more of a difference. In kWh you spend roughly 3 times more in an ICE than an EV of the same size
.
 

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Two points.
The official range here is 126 miles but in summer I am now getting 133 miles displayed when fully charged (with AirCon on).
I always found petrol/diesel cars to be about 5% optimistic when comparing mpg displayed with the real-life calculated figure. But the MX-30 displays 4.3 m/kWh when, in reality, it is just 3.8 (calculated by adding all my on-line charging statements). That is a 13% exaggeration!
 

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Two points.
The official range here is 126 miles but in summer I am now getting 133 miles displayed when fully charged (with AirCon on).
I always found petrol/diesel cars to be about 5% optimistic when comparing mpg displayed with the real-life calculated figure. But the MX-30 displays 4.3 m/kWh when, in reality, it is just 3.8 (calculated by adding all my on-line charging statements). That is a 13% exaggeration!
You have to take charging loss into account. Some energy is spent in heat caused by resistance etc. Conversion from AC to DC. So unfortunately not all the current/energy from the wallbox ends up in the battery. But sure the car could be overly optimistic as well.
 

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Forgive me but I'm not quite sure what you mean. Are you saying that you haven't reset the trip and you average 4.3 m/kWhr over many miles and then equate that to kWhr charged? When considering the electricity consumption during charge, do you take that measure from the charger and what accuracy do you ascribe to that? Additionally, charging is not 100% efficient by any means. I have tried to compute this but I am lacking information to do it correctly. However, when charging at 6.6kW, feel the temperature of the radiator after an hour. That is certainly a loss of several hundred watt equivalent. Then, there is similar inefficiency in the battery discharge, electric motor, resistive loss, gear loss etc. Can you explain a little further please.
 

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Forgive me but I'm not quite sure what you mean. Are you saying that you haven't reset the trip and you average 4.3 m/kWhr over many miles and then equate that to kWhr charged? When considering the electricity consumption during charge, do you take that measure from the charger and what accuracy do you ascribe to that? Additionally, charging is not 100% efficient by any means. I have tried to compute this but I am lacking information to do it correctly. However, when charging at 6.6kW, feel the temperature of the radiator after an hour. That is certainly a loss of several hundred watt equivalent. Then, there is similar inefficiency in the battery discharge, electric motor, resistive loss, gear loss etc. Can you explain a little further please.
German ADAC have looked inte this in detail. But perhaps many assume that charging a battery is a perfect process similar to pouring liquid into a tank.
But EVs are vastly superior efficiency wise charging loss or no charging loss.
 

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Hello, i just bought my Mx-30 Built 2020-06.

the car had 4000km on the dash and the question i have is my range on 100% is around 160kms at 16kw/h avarage consumption with outside temp at 18 degrees Celsius. Is this a normal range or is it something that gets better?

BR
 

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Hi, I got my car in December, my first electric vehicle. Even though I was aware of the limited range of my MX-30, I had to immediately deal with how much cold temperature and heating affect the range. For the whole winter I never managed to score the promised 200km range.

When temperature increased, things started to get better, but what really changed everything is when I learned to "drive with hands".
Using a lot the paddles to regen the battery is a game changer and makes driving so much fun. I find more important to master how to slow down the car with the paddles and understand when let the car roll than being always conservative with speed and acceleration.

Of course you want to be gentle with the throttle, and constant 120 km/hr will reduce greatly the range. But learning how to use the regen, especially when nonetheless you have to slow down or when you are going downhill, will allow you to score big numbers.

This spring and summer I have been constantly above 200 km range, although I don't drive often on the highway.

Suggestion: change your cockpit view to show the average consumption, and pay attention to the bar that shows you when you are above or below the average scored value. This will make you aware how to properly use the throttle and you will understand faster how to drive the car more efficiently.
 

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2 responses:
VivaMazda - Yes you are right. But does it make more sense to say "My electricity costs are 5.3 pence per mile" or "My costs are 4.7 pence per mile plus quite a bit more due to losses whilst charging"?
Milkfloat - I reset the car when I got it and after 1000 miles added the electricity used at my home charger to that from ChargePlaceScotland and did the division. I reset the car and repeated the process after 2000 miles. This is made easier by the fact that I use electricity from only these two sources. I would imagine that the figures provided by the charging meters are reasonably accurate.
 

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2 responses:
VivaMazda - Yes you are right. But does it make more sense to say "My electricity costs are 5.3 pence per mile" or "My costs are 4.7 pence per mile plus quite a bit more due to losses whilst charging"?
Milkfloat - I reset the car when I got it and after 1000 miles added the electricity used at my home charger to that from ChargePlaceScotland and did the division. I reset the car and repeated the process after 2000 miles. This is made easier by the fact that I use electricity from only these two sources. I would imagine that the figures provided by the charging meters are reasonably accurate.
When it comes to range you dont have to worry about charging losses. Whether you make it home or not is priority number one when driving.
When it comes down to costs for energy the point here is that you are using a vehicle that plays in Premier League. Compared to fossil fuels there is no comparison. Its also an investment in the future of our planet. Maybe thats sounds priggish but its true.
 

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OK aljshep; thanks for the extra information. Indeed, each of us uses whatever metric we are happy with. If you use miles divided by gross energy supplied then fine but that is not what the Mazda readout is showing. Vivamazda is quietly pointing out with an ICE car, one never knew how much energy was purchased in the form of petrol so therfore don't fret over throwing 62%, or more, of that energy away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
On a different note, has someone tried charging with anything higher than 50kw? Does it charge faster or is that the Mx-30s charging speed cap?
 

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Mazda is a bit more vague about the upper limit for the DC charge controller but it is certainly less than 50kW and would appear to be 37.5kW. Additionally, it won't hold that charge rate for long and you will see the rate drop off after 20 minutes or so depending upon battery and ambient conditions. The Mazda quoted 36 minutes for 20 to 80% doesn't mention that the rate falls rapidly after 80% and is at ideal ambient. But the inescapable fact is that there is no point in seeking out a charger greater than 50kW.
 

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On a different note, has someone tried charging with anything higher than 50kw? Does it charge faster or is that the Mx-30s charging speed cap?
Never seen anything higher than 38 kW.
But the charging curve is a good shape.
So it charges surprisingly well at higher states of charge relatively speaking.

The trick though is to charge at lower SOC after driving with a warmer battery. If you plan to rapid charge all the time you will be happier with another EV e g Ioniq5, Tesla etc.
But for occasional use its absolutely fine.
Short top ups to make it home is no problem.
 
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